Archives for posts with tag: #audpeeps

In my previous blog I made a case for the need for hearing loop technology in public places. For hearing loops to benefit consumers – the hearing loops have to be installed to meet the IEC 60118-4 standard, clear hearing loop signage has to be provided and the consumer needs to know how to link into the hearing loop signal.

The good news is that more and more hearing aids, even small mini-devices, now come equipped with telecoils. And, thanks to the advocacy of the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA),  active HLAA members and ardent hearing loop advocates around the country, more and more places are installing hearing loops.

But…a common complaint among loop advocates is that still way too many hearing aid using consumers are tragically unaware their hearing devices include this telecoil.  What can we do to correct this? That is where audiologists could play an important, even a pivotal, role. By including and activating telecoils in the hearing aids they fit, taking 5 minutes to demonstrating their benefit, and handing out information on the Americans with Disabilities Act would go a long way.

Here is what I believe hearing aid consumers should expect from hearing aid providers:

  1. The provider orders hearing aids that have built-in, vertically oriented telecoils. These telecoils, when turned on, need to offer the same gain and frequency response setting to a 60 dB sound input as compared to a 31.6 mA/m magnetic sound input. In audiology parlance this means the instrument has to have a matching ANSI SPLIV test The good news is that most European hearing aid makes meet this so called Nordic Telecoil standard.
  2. The audiologist activates the telecoil and offers the consumer clear instructions on how to use it (preferably in writing). The gold standard is that the telecoil setting is verified in a test box or in a waiting room with a TV connected to a hearing loop. If your provider doesn’t offer a hearing loop in their waiting or treatment room– share this article by Drs. Caccavo and Lopez . In it they explain why every provider needs a loop in the office.
  3. The hearing care provider explains the capabilities as well as the limitations of hearing aids, and how to overcome these limitations. Consumers need to be told that thanks to the Americans with Disability Act hearing well (in places where PA systems are used) is their civil right. That consumers should expect reasonable accommodations for people with hearing loss, just like people in wheel-chairs expect ramps and elevators. Every consumer needs to be given information how assistive technology works with a telecoil. Brochure examples can be found on the Hearing Loss Association of America  and the American Academy of Audiology websites.
  4. The audiologist is a vocal advocate for hearing access rights in the community. Where providers take on this role or where providers work hand in hand with their clients, hearing loops appear. Some providers even hand out hearing loop advocacy cards  their clients can take around in the community. Many a loop has been fostered when this conversation about hearing access was started. And when places are unwilling to offer access mandated by the ADA? Providers could offer the link to file complaints with the Department of Justice:ada.gov/filing_complaints on their practice websites.

Should you be told, when you ask about telecoils, that 1) you don’t need one, 2) that they are old technology or 3) that there aren’t enough loops around to make it worthwhile for you to get one – question his or her authority. Telecoils and hearing loops have greatly improved in the last decade and progress is being made daily in the Looping of America. To find hearing loops near you visit www.aldlocator.com , www.LoopFinder.com  or download the Loop My Phone app on iTunes.

Hearing advocates around the country are fighting for your right to hear. Join the fight – ask me how. Email me at jsterkens@hearingloss.org

 

waiting-room

 


Recently I received a letter (in Danish mind you) from an experienced cochlear implant user who describes her personal experience with Cochlear’s new Loop Booster accessory. Thanks to Google Translate and Janni, the writer of the letter, I was able to translate it so that English speaking CI users can read about her Loop Booster experience.

Full disclosure: Janni Glæsner is the past president of the Danish Adult Cochlear Implant Association CIF http://cochlearimplant.dk/ and is currently is employed by Danaflex, the Danish distributor of Cochlear Products.

Johannes Kirke

The Johannes Church in Greve, DK offers a hearing loop for hearing device users. Like nearly all churches in Scandinavia

 

And the Noise Disappeared…

I don’t have to use a hearing loop often with my cochlear implant processors, but recently I was a confirmation at the Johannes Church in Greve Denmark and needed to turn on my telecoil to follow the sermon. I heard what I nearly always hear when I turn the telecoils my Cochlear CP810 processor on: a hum and crackling and my head orientation affects the loop signal strength.  Now, this noise doesn’t really bother me as it will not drown out the speech I want to hear. The crackle is just there, like the humming of a heating system or a fan. So if I think the sound is a bit too far away and requires me to pay very close attention to hear, such as at a lecture,  I use the telecoil, where possible.

A few weeks ago I learned of a new product from Cochlear called a Loop Booster. The Loop Booster is externally mounted on my Cochlear Implant device replacing the internal telecoil in the processor. The Loop Booster is larger and is said to improve the reception of sound through an induction loop system. Well, this aroused my curiosity!  Could a Loop Booster, I wondered, dampen – or perhaps even eliminate the hum and crackling I hear when using a  loop system? It was time for another visit to Johannes Church. So last Sunday I made the trek back to church to attend the All Saints Service.

I found a place discreetly on one of the back rows and settled in with a hymnal, my implant’s remote control and two Loop Boosters. Let the experiment begin!

loop Booster only

Loop Booster Attachment

My first thought turned to the loop system itself. Would it be turned on for the service? It sure was. But, as soon as I turned my processors’ telecoils on, the familiar hum and crackling appeared and when I moved my head the voice of the minister faded and the hum became even worse. It was time to attach the Loop Boosters on both processors. What happened next was amazing: The humming and crackling noise disappeared … and the sound was louder and clearer. It was as if an audio cable was connected from the microphone in the church to my processors. And when I moved my head, the signal did not disappear like it did when I used the built in telecoils. I also did not need to fine-tune using my remote control like I had to in the past.  The sound was clear and bright, just like I like! Wow!

Loop Booster

Cochlear CP810 Processor with the Loop Booster attached

Janni 2

Janni Glæsner

Because I have heard that other CI users have problems with noise when they use the processor’s telecoils I am sharing this experience with you, and am curious as to whether the Loop Booster works for others.
Signed: Janni Glæsner 

PS: Readers of this blog may want to know that Janni lives in Denmark where, fortunately for all telecoil equipped hearing aids and all cochlear implants users, hearing loops are common place.  She uses Cochlear Model 5 CP810’s in both ears, but told me that the Loop Booster can also be used for the Nucleus Model 6 CP 910 processors. Janni and I would love to hear from other users of the Loop Booster. Janni can be reached via her Facebook page www.facebook.com/janni.glaesner?fref=ts and I can be reached at jsterkens@new.rr.com

Kudos to Cochlear for listening to its customers.
A few years back, many cochlear implant users complained that the older Freedom processors with their vertically positioned telecoils had better hearing loop reception than the newer Nucleus devices whose telecoils were mounted horizontally. It is nice to know the company took these complaints seriously and developed this new telecoil attachment. Telecoils can dramatically enhance the cochlear implant user’s hearing experience in public venues that offer hearing loops as shown in a recently published study in the October 2014 Hearing Review

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As the HLAA Hearing Loop Advocate, what I am doing in my home state of Wisconsin, in the country and beyond is not just promoting loops.  I am foremost raising awareness and improving the understanding of hearing loss.  By explaining what hearing loss is, how hearing aids help but have significant limitations especially for those with more severe loss, and in reverberant and noisy larger public places (and yes professionals need to hear this message too) and how hearing loops can provide seamless access much like wheelchair ramps do for people with mobility handicaps, I build the case for hearing loops.

FM and Infrared assistive technology were and are a solution for hearing access but not a seamless solution. FM and IR devices are a hassle and rarely excite folks like loops do.  Hearing aid users have to go out of their way to use FM/IR, hearing aid users have to self-identify to find these devices only to find out they malfunction, and are like Richard Einhorn says – are just not a dignified solution… more an afterthought.  And many of us have found that the typical hearing aid user (the people who sit in the typical audiology and HA offices, the ones who are not likely to join HLAA even when given membership materials) will not bother using FM or IR devices.

Hearing loops, I have found, are very much used and appreciated by the typical non-HLAA member hearing aid users. Knowing about hearing loop technology also spurns action by normal hearing folks and thanks to them many loops are being installed in houses of worship, retirement centers and libraries. Once the loops are in the response from the users is often overwhelmingly positive, emotional and accompanied with lot of smiles. All this of course reinforces that the loop installation was the right thing to do.

Looped waiting room in audiology office

Looped waiting room in audiology office

But…in order to benefit, consumers need telecoils in their instruments.   It is unfortunate that hearing loop advocates like myself,  continue to run into far too many consumers around my state and the country who were never informed or never demonstrated how the telecoil can wirelessly link into the hearing loop.

How can we increase the number of hearing aids that are equipped with telecoils? It foremost means raising awareness of the benefit of telecoils. I have heard some anecdotal evidence that this positive word of mouth thanks to nearly 300 hearing loops in Wisconsin is increasing the number of consumers who know about t-coils.  I hear from hearing aid manufacturer’s reps that Wisconsin hearing aid providers now routinely inquire about telecoils in new products. And it is not just consumers who benefit. I recently received an email from a minister in Oshkosh thanking me for educating her on telecoils. The minister was confident when she counseled one of her parishioners on the kind of hearing aid features to consider. Her advice was confirmed with big smiles and thanks you’s when he used the loop for the first time after following her advice.  Awareness would also increase if audiologists and dispensers would loop their waiting rooms. In the Fox Valley many providers have taken this step – see here and here

That telecoils are an important feature in hearing aids was recently endorsed by the Office for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Wisconsin. The  Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing proclaimed that all consumers need to be told about telecoils before ordering hearing aids.  I would think it would better yet for consumers in Wisconsin if WSHA , the Wisconsin Speech, Language and Hearing Association for audiologists and speech, language pathologists, as well as WAHP, the Wisconsin Alliance of Hearing Professionals, would go on record recommending the same.  These professionals are licensed by the State of Wisconsin to provide hearing healthcare that is in the best interest of consumers.  Together we could strengthen consumer protection for consumers with hearing loss and support a similar law Arizona recently passed.

The Arizona law mandates telecoil counseling for potential hearing aid clients by audiologists and hearing instrument specialists. A similar law in Wisconsin would certainly make it less likely that I encounter hearing aid users who were never told about the telecoil benefits even though they followed the costly recommendations of the professional licensed by the state of Wisconsin. Without telecoils consumers are unable to benefit from hearing loops nor can they use  all kind of other assistive technology that requires a telecoil such as the new ClearSounds Quattro. Consumers deserve better than to be left out of the (hearing) loop.