Archives for posts with tag: hearing induction loop


Recently I received a letter (in Danish mind you) from an experienced cochlear implant user who describes her personal experience with Cochlear’s new Loop Booster accessory. Thanks to Google Translate and Janni, the writer of the letter, I was able to translate it so that English speaking CI users can read about her Loop Booster experience.

Full disclosure: Janni Glæsner is the past president of the Danish Adult Cochlear Implant Association CIF http://cochlearimplant.dk/ and is currently is employed by Danaflex, the Danish distributor of Cochlear Products.

Johannes Kirke

The Johannes Church in Greve, DK offers a hearing loop for hearing device users. Like nearly all churches in Scandinavia

 

And the Noise Disappeared…

I don’t have to use a hearing loop often with my cochlear implant processors, but recently I was a confirmation at the Johannes Church in Greve Denmark and needed to turn on my telecoil to follow the sermon. I heard what I nearly always hear when I turn the telecoils my Cochlear CP810 processor on: a hum and crackling and my head orientation affects the loop signal strength.  Now, this noise doesn’t really bother me as it will not drown out the speech I want to hear. The crackle is just there, like the humming of a heating system or a fan. So if I think the sound is a bit too far away and requires me to pay very close attention to hear, such as at a lecture,  I use the telecoil, where possible.

A few weeks ago I learned of a new product from Cochlear called a Loop Booster. The Loop Booster is externally mounted on my Cochlear Implant device replacing the internal telecoil in the processor. The Loop Booster is larger and is said to improve the reception of sound through an induction loop system. Well, this aroused my curiosity!  Could a Loop Booster, I wondered, dampen – or perhaps even eliminate the hum and crackling I hear when using a  loop system? It was time for another visit to Johannes Church. So last Sunday I made the trek back to church to attend the All Saints Service.

I found a place discreetly on one of the back rows and settled in with a hymnal, my implant’s remote control and two Loop Boosters. Let the experiment begin!

loop Booster only

Loop Booster Attachment

My first thought turned to the loop system itself. Would it be turned on for the service? It sure was. But, as soon as I turned my processors’ telecoils on, the familiar hum and crackling appeared and when I moved my head the voice of the minister faded and the hum became even worse. It was time to attach the Loop Boosters on both processors. What happened next was amazing: The humming and crackling noise disappeared … and the sound was louder and clearer. It was as if an audio cable was connected from the microphone in the church to my processors. And when I moved my head, the signal did not disappear like it did when I used the built in telecoils. I also did not need to fine-tune using my remote control like I had to in the past.  The sound was clear and bright, just like I like! Wow!

Loop Booster

Cochlear CP810 Processor with the Loop Booster attached

Janni 2

Janni Glæsner

Because I have heard that other CI users have problems with noise when they use the processor’s telecoils I am sharing this experience with you, and am curious as to whether the Loop Booster works for others.
Signed: Janni Glæsner 

PS: Readers of this blog may want to know that Janni lives in Denmark where, fortunately for all telecoil equipped hearing aids and all cochlear implants users, hearing loops are common place.  She uses Cochlear Model 5 CP810’s in both ears, but told me that the Loop Booster can also be used for the Nucleus Model 6 CP 910 processors. Janni and I would love to hear from other users of the Loop Booster. Janni can be reached via her Facebook page www.facebook.com/janni.glaesner?fref=ts and I can be reached at jsterkens@new.rr.com

Kudos to Cochlear for listening to its customers.
A few years back, many cochlear implant users complained that the older Freedom processors with their vertically positioned telecoils had better hearing loop reception than the newer Nucleus devices whose telecoils were mounted horizontally. It is nice to know the company took these complaints seriously and developed this new telecoil attachment. Telecoils can dramatically enhance the cochlear implant user’s hearing experience in public venues that offer hearing loops as shown in a recently published study in the October 2014 Hearing Review

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This is a rerun of a letter to the editor of Hearing Journal – back in December 2010

As an audiologist for close to 27 years in a small private practice, I think I’ve stumbled on what will finally make many of my patients happy. I have been in houses of worship and other public places where, although I have normal hearing, it was difficult to hear. That made me think about my patients: If I could barely hear, how wouldthey fare? I know that few of them speak up, pick up an assistive device, or move closer. More often they will complain about their hearing aid (to me!) and just sit there or stop attending these events.

The seminars I’ve given at churches and senior centers did little to increase use of FM assistive devices, and advocating for neckloop purchases rarely turned them into believers in FM technology. I have tied myself in pretzels trying to get them to advocate for themselves. That is, until I heard Dr. Dave Myers speak at a meeting about his success in looping Western Michigan.

Hearing loops turn any telecoil-equipped hearing instrument into a speaker for the PA system. This simple, unsexy, low-tech t-coil turns your hearing aid into a personalized listening device that significantly and effortlessly improves the signal-to-noise ratio—that elusive goal we all are looking for when we fit directional-microphone instruments.

As audiologists, we also know that the small SNR improvements these D-microphones provide rarely satisfy the needs of the patient, who, besides having a hearing deficit, frequently has auditory processing challenges and therefore needs an SNR improvement not possible with an ear-level device, no matter what its level of technology. This is a physics problem, not a hearing aid problem.

Enter the hearing loop, also known as “Wi-Fi for hearing aids.” It circumvents the physics problem. It does for hearing aids what no other assistive device can: Make our patients hear better in situations where heretofore they could not. It is truly the missing link in our practice. Hearing loops use the t-coil, which is present in 60% of all hearing aids sold in the U.S. and in over 90% of high-power instruments. The t-coil is low cost, low in power consumption, and, best of all, easy to use.

As audiologists, we need to advocate for our patients. Our advocacy will help them hear so much better. I will even go as far as to say that, under some circumstances, persons using the loop will hear betterthan the persons sitting beside them.

Advocating for hearing loop technology is easy. You start with your own waiting room: Install a small loop driver and start demonstrating it. Contact a reputable professional audio company and explain that you would like to work with them in bringing this technology to area churches. Donate a hearing loop driver/amplifier to your own church, community theater, or seniors meeting room to get it going. And start giving speeches to service clubs or retirement centers. Trust me, hearing is believing!

Collectively supporting “hearing loop initiatives” in our local communities will result, sooner rather than later, in a “Looped America,” as Dr. Dave Myers has written in the Sept./Oct. 2008Hearing Loss Magazine.

No technology now or in the near future can do what induction hearing loop technology can do today! Our advocacy will let America know we truly “Care for America’s Hearing” and we will benefit with increased acceptance and use of hearing aids.

Juliette Sterkens, AuD

Oshkosh, WI

 (The original letter can be found here: http://journals.lww.com/thehearingjournal/Fulltext/2010/12000/Hearing_Loops_Make_Consumers_Flip_Where_Hearing.9.aspx)