Archives for posts with tag: induction loop and assistive listening systems


Recently I received a letter (in Danish mind you) from an experienced cochlear implant user who describes her personal experience with Cochlear’s new Loop Booster accessory. Thanks to Google Translate and Janni, the writer of the letter, I was able to translate it so that English speaking CI users can read about her Loop Booster experience.

Full disclosure: Janni Glæsner is the past president of the Danish Adult Cochlear Implant Association CIF http://cochlearimplant.dk/ and is currently is employed by Danaflex, the Danish distributor of Cochlear Products.

Johannes Kirke

The Johannes Church in Greve, DK offers a hearing loop for hearing device users. Like nearly all churches in Scandinavia

 

And the Noise Disappeared…

I don’t have to use a hearing loop often with my cochlear implant processors, but recently I was a confirmation at the Johannes Church in Greve Denmark and needed to turn on my telecoil to follow the sermon. I heard what I nearly always hear when I turn the telecoils my Cochlear CP810 processor on: a hum and crackling and my head orientation affects the loop signal strength.  Now, this noise doesn’t really bother me as it will not drown out the speech I want to hear. The crackle is just there, like the humming of a heating system or a fan. So if I think the sound is a bit too far away and requires me to pay very close attention to hear, such as at a lecture,  I use the telecoil, where possible.

A few weeks ago I learned of a new product from Cochlear called a Loop Booster. The Loop Booster is externally mounted on my Cochlear Implant device replacing the internal telecoil in the processor. The Loop Booster is larger and is said to improve the reception of sound through an induction loop system. Well, this aroused my curiosity!  Could a Loop Booster, I wondered, dampen – or perhaps even eliminate the hum and crackling I hear when using a  loop system? It was time for another visit to Johannes Church. So last Sunday I made the trek back to church to attend the All Saints Service.

I found a place discreetly on one of the back rows and settled in with a hymnal, my implant’s remote control and two Loop Boosters. Let the experiment begin!

loop Booster only

Loop Booster Attachment

My first thought turned to the loop system itself. Would it be turned on for the service? It sure was. But, as soon as I turned my processors’ telecoils on, the familiar hum and crackling appeared and when I moved my head the voice of the minister faded and the hum became even worse. It was time to attach the Loop Boosters on both processors. What happened next was amazing: The humming and crackling noise disappeared … and the sound was louder and clearer. It was as if an audio cable was connected from the microphone in the church to my processors. And when I moved my head, the signal did not disappear like it did when I used the built in telecoils. I also did not need to fine-tune using my remote control like I had to in the past.  The sound was clear and bright, just like I like! Wow!

Loop Booster

Cochlear CP810 Processor with the Loop Booster attached

Janni 2

Janni Glæsner

Because I have heard that other CI users have problems with noise when they use the processor’s telecoils I am sharing this experience with you, and am curious as to whether the Loop Booster works for others.
Signed: Janni Glæsner 

PS: Readers of this blog may want to know that Janni lives in Denmark where, fortunately for all telecoil equipped hearing aids and all cochlear implants users, hearing loops are common place.  She uses Cochlear Model 5 CP810’s in both ears, but told me that the Loop Booster can also be used for the Nucleus Model 6 CP 910 processors. Janni and I would love to hear from other users of the Loop Booster. Janni can be reached via her Facebook page www.facebook.com/janni.glaesner?fref=ts and I can be reached at jsterkens@new.rr.com

Kudos to Cochlear for listening to its customers.
A few years back, many cochlear implant users complained that the older Freedom processors with their vertically positioned telecoils had better hearing loop reception than the newer Nucleus devices whose telecoils were mounted horizontally. It is nice to know the company took these complaints seriously and developed this new telecoil attachment. Telecoils can dramatically enhance the cochlear implant user’s hearing experience in public venues that offer hearing loops as shown in a recently published study in the October 2014 Hearing Review

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On July 17th the ANSI A117.1 Committee convened in Washington DC voted to revise the current 2009 International Building Code to include a statement that when a hearing loop is installed it shall meet the IEC 60118-4 induction hearing loop standard.  This paper explains why this is important.

There are so many different groups involved each with their own acronyms… it is enough to drive someone like me, an advocate focused on helping people with hearing loss hear better in public places, to exasperation.  ADA, ANSI, ICC and IBC, Chapter 11 and Section 706 did not mean much to me up until a few weeks ago but the light is beginning to dawn.

The Americans with Disabilities Act, commonly referred to as the ADA, is a law that among other things, ensures access to the built environment for people with disabilities.  The ADA standard establishes design requirements for the construction and alteration of facilities subject to the law.  These enforceable standards apply to places of public accommodation, commercial facilities, and state and local government facilities.

It is the US Access Board that is responsible for developing and updating design guidelines known as the ADA Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG).  These guidelines are used by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Department of Transportation (DOT) in setting enforceable standards that the public must follow.

In the ADA Standards, Chapter 2 on scoping, section 219, the reasons for accessible design are explained see http://www.ada.gov/regs2010/2010ADAStandards/2010ADAstandards.htm#pgfId-1010597

  • The term scoping refers to what facilities need to be accessible. In regards to hearing accessibility the scoping requirements dictate that in assembly areas where audible communication is integral to the use of the space, an assistive listening system shall be provided.  Section 219 lists one exception: Other than in courtrooms, assistive listening systems shall not be required where audio amplification is not provided.

It is in ADA Standards Chapter 7, section 706 that the technical requirements for accessible design are explained see http://www.ada.gov/regs2010/2010ADAStandards/2010ADAstandards.htm#pgfId-1006522

  • The technical requirements refer to the design and construction specifications and are found in section 706. In the case of hearing accessibility Section 706 dictates that 25% of the required assistive listening receivers shall be hearing aid compatible via the use of a neckloop, that a 1/8” standard mono jack shall be provided and that the individual receivers shall meet certain standards in regards to SPL, Peak-Clipping and  SNR levels.

It is the International Code Council (ICC), a member-focused association, dedicated to developing model codes and standards used in the design, build and compliance process to construct safe, sustainable, affordable and resilient structures that develops the International Building Code or IBC aka the “I-Code”.

Most U.S. communities and many global markets choose to reference the IBC. This code book, which is the most widely adopted building code in the United States, comprises of 35 chapters and a series of Appendices A thru M. When referenced in local, state or federal legislation, the IBC becomes the minimum requirement for construction.

Chapter 11 of the International Building Code addresses accessible design and construction of facilities for physically disabled persons. Chapter 11 is developed by the ANSI A117.1 committee. This A117.1 standard is a recognized accessibility standard that provides the technical criteria which must be met in order to accomplish the required level of accessibility. When sites, facilities, buildings and elements are built to the specifications in the A117.1 they become usable by people with disabilities.

A117.1 is comprised of 11 chapters and it is chapter 7, section 706 that specifically deals with Assistive listening systems. Section A117.1 is a scoping free document. In other words, it has no triggers telling the user when to apply the specific criteria, that is what the ADA standard does.

For the readers of this document it is important to know that section 706 of the ANSI A117.1 Standard is not Section 706 of the 2010 ADA Standards.  At this time, it is only ANSI A117.1, section 706 that has been changed.  Section 706 of the ADA standards has not been changed.  Once states adopt the new A117.1 building code, the IBC code will be more stringent than the ADA standards.

What exactly was accomplished at the ANSI A117.1 meeting?

Until A117.1 is officially adopted, slated for December 2014, hearing loop installers and advocates will be able to state to architects, designers, construction companies and building inspectors  that the proposal to modify the 2009 IBC was passed and will be changed to reference the IEC 60118-4 hearing loop standard.

It is important to keep in mind that once A117.1 is officially adopted it will not indicate that hearing loops are the assistive listening system of choice for hearing aid users nor does it recommend using hearing loops as the default assistive listening system.

Currently the ADA Standards lists FM and IR technology as an equivalent assistive listening option for people with hearing loss. The ADA guidelines fail to take the users’ preferences into account, one study show experienced hearing aid users preferring hearing loops over FM/IR technology nearly 9 to 1, nor does it mention the numerous advantages of hearing loops listed here: http://www.hearingloop.org/fq_preferred.htm).

That hearing loops should be considered the assistive listening system of choice, because they are fully hearing aid compatible and therefore do not require the use of an auxiliary receiver, needs to be addressed by the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) and other consumer organization such as ALDA, NAD, TDI and AMPHL, when the ADA Accessibility Guidelines are up for review.

Juliette Sterkens, AuD
HLAA Hearing Loop Advocate