It saddens me when hearing care professionals and audiologists use the language of hearing loops and telecoils are “old technology” or “technology on its way out” – by using such words they are promoting a MYTH that helping to promote loops is somehow not worthy of our support – and nothing could be further from the truth. If you have been following the loop technology (as I have)- their technology is improving as are their methods of installation. There is NOTHING new on the horizon (oh how I wish there was as installations can be wickedly difficult and occasionally cost prohibitive – but hey? Does anyone inquire about the cost of the elevator?) and our clients deserve to hear better in public venues TODAY.

The ONLY way to help clients hear in public venues is via a loop or an assistive listening system. Hearing aids just do not sound that great in larger public venues. They are what they are: Microphones worn on top of ears. In a hearing loop that meets the IEC 60118-4 standard the clarity is amazing, I have heard in hundreds of them. I personally love how they help my not-so-young-Dutch-brain hear. Loops are (relatively) easy to use and loops & do not reduce battery life. And best of all they sound good. In a loop it is as if you are a mere inches from the mouth of the speaker (who is using a mic). The result? Hearing aid clients rave about them and think the provider (who told them about loops) walks on water when they can once again hear in a place of worship where they had given up the thought of ever hearing clearly again.

If you are a professional and want to help foster hearing loops in your community read my blog here:blog , visit my www.loopwisconsin.com website or email me at jsterkens@hearingloss.org. If you are a consumer: why not print out this blog and share a copy with your audiologist or hearing aid provider?

blog_1

Advertisements